The Rare Barrel
 
December 20, 2017 | The Rare Barrel

Terminal Acidic Shock and Sour Ale Bottle Conditioning

Here at The Rare Barrel we bottle condition all of our bottled beers. While bottle conditioning can be a little more challenging that force carbonation, we believe that this is an important step for creating the best flavor profile.  In short, bottle conditioning means that we add a simple sugar (Dextrose) and new dry yeast to a beer before packaging. And then we wait… A new fermentation occurs in the bottle to carbonate it, this also adds a richness and body that we are fond of.
 
Unfortunately, most yeasts do not perform optimally at a very low pH or at a high alcohol content. In the past we, along with other breweries that bottle condition sour beers, have had issues with inconsistent and under carbonated conditioning results. Even experiencing batches where carbonation nearly completely fails. This is obviously an incredibly disappointing incident, we love the beer we make and we want you to experience the best presentation of our beer.  As Quality Manager, I wanted to help overcome this issue. After doing a bit of research on yeast shock and speaking with a few breweries, we created a protocol to improve consistency in carbonation and bottle conditioning.
 

What is Terminal Acidic Shock (or TAS)?

Terminal Acidic Shock refers to the death or dormancy of Saccharomyces cerevisiae during fermentation in a high acidity and high ethanol content environment (Rogers et.al.) To combat this many breweries will temper a yeast addition slurry with a portion of the beer to be carbonated. This allows the yeast to slowly adjust to the severe conditions and have a few generations of growth within a few steps to increase the productivity once pitched into the beer and bottled.
 

The Experiment

To test different mediums and processes I created an experiment where I took the dry yeast and hydrated it with a sugar solution.  A few different types of low sugar content solutions were tested in this experiment including wort and varying sugar water concentrations. After adding the same amount of yeast to every sugar solution I allowed 2 days for some growth and fermentation. I then added a 50:50 solution of more low sugar solution and sour beer and waited another 2 days. I then tested cell viability and density as will as pH and gravity changes. I concluded that a 2 degree Plato water and dextrose with nutrient added yielded the healthiest yeast at the end of the beer tempering. The slurry was then added to a small bottling run. I also compared this experimental slurry to a control of just day-of rehydrated dry yeast which was our current method of yeast preparation. I concluded that the tempering increased yeast health and decreased conditioning time (tested by yeast viability and pH/gravity changes).
*QA/QC Manager Jenna Blair counting cells of Saccharamyces and Brettanomyces mixed cultures under a microscope.
 

Our New Procedure

We now boil dextrose and water with a small amount of yeast nutrient to a vessel cool to an optimized fermentation temperature, add yeast and allow for 24 hours of fermentation, then add a 50% 2 Plato sugar water and 50% beer solution the day before bottling and count the yeast each day during tempering in order to assure the yeast we pitch is healthy. On bottling day we add sugar to the beer which is calculated based on the desired CO2 volumes and then count the slurry of tempered yeast and pitch by weight for a goal of 2 million cells/ml. This may seem like a lot as it is far over what would be recommended for a pale ale but for sour/barrel aged beers even with the tempering 1.5-3 mil cells/ml is recommended.
*Weighing dextrose before adding to boiling water.
 
Scaling this experiment up to our needs was interesting, anyone who we had known that had tried anything like this had small enough bottling runs where the liquid and yeast additions could all be contained in a small flask! We adopted the procedure to yeast brinks converted from full half barrel kegs and eventually into our 5 barrel fermenter for our largest bottling batches.
* Top Photo: Cellar Technicians weigh dry yeast that will NOT be added to the dextrose mixture to ensure that the yeast added is not contaminated.
 
Bottom Photo: Yeast starter after dry yeast has been added to the dextrose mixture prior to transfering to a brink 24 hours before bottling day.
 
Though not without challenges we have experienced favorable results with this procedure. We have seen shorter carbonation times as well as more bottle to bottle consistency. We are however continuously tweaking the procedure. We plan to play with different liquid addition volumes and sugar water to beer rations as well as pitch rates. Our goal is first and foremost to make good beer, we get to accomplish this by continuing research and experimentation not only in fermentation and blending but also by conducting experiments that can streamline process and improve the quality of our product.
 
Consistency and predictability are often regarded as some of the pillars in beer quality assurance and control. Sour beer is a beast that refuses to be controlled but with continuous experimentation we are enthusiastically working towards higher caliber beers.
 
If you have any questions, feel free to comment below.
 
Jenna Blair
QA/QC Manager

 
Rogers, C. M., Veatch, D., Covey, A., Staton, C., & Bochman, M. L. (2016). Terminal acidic shock inhibits sour beer bottle conditioning by Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Food Microbiology,57, 151-158. doi:10.1016/j.fm.2016.02.012

 

Time Posted: Dec 20, 2017 at 9:00 AM
The Rare Barrel
 
December 11, 2017 | The Rare Barrel

We're Hiring | Line Cook

About

The Rare Barrel, an award winning, all-sour beer company based in Berkeley, CA, has an opening for a part-time line cook! We are searching for someone responsible and trustworthy who can match our passion for sour beer and food. Prior experience working in a commercial kitchen is a must. The new kitchen at The Rare Barrel will serve New American food with a focus on seasonal and local ingredients. We make as many things in house as possible and the menu will change to reflect seasonal and exciting ingredients.
 

Hours

This position will require availability for a minimum of 3 shifts (Friday, Saturday, and Sunday) per week (25-30 hours per week).
Kitchen shifts are Fridays, Saturdays, and Sundays . Must be available afternoons and evenings. Availability for special events, which occur around 5-7 times per year, is also required. Hours of operations are subject to change.
 

Pay

Hourly rate: DOE
In addition to hourly rate, employees receive a monthly allowance for The Rare Barrel beer, food, and merch, as well as bottles of each new release.
 

Requirements

  • Applicants should have a great attitude and take pride in communicating effectively with fellow employees.  
  • Applicants must be able to stand for long periods of time and be comfortable working on their feet. Applicants must also be able to lift 60 lbs (this is a bona fide requirement of the job).
  • Successful applicants must have their ServSafe Food Server certification prior to first day working in the Tasting Kitchen. Successful applicants must renew these certifications (or their equivalent if changed over time) thereafter in accordance with company policy and regulatory requirements.
  • Applicants must be a team player, honest, trustworthy, dedicated, hard-working, self-motivated, and possess a keen attention to detail. A personal commitment to cleanliness and efficiency is required.
  • Must love sours.

Duties

Setup:
  • Prepping ingredients for service
  • Setup food and equipment for service
Service:
  • Work stations - cooking and plating as directed by Chef
  • Stock/restock stations
  • Ensure seasoning, quality, and appearance of all dishes
  • Communicate any inventory or repair needs to Chef
Breakdown:
  • Change out all pans and clean gaskets
  • Clean inside fridges, oven, induction burners, immersion circulators, and panini press
  • Maintain dishwashers as directed by Chef
  • Assist food runners in washing dishes
  • Turn off food warmer, oven, circulators, cryovac, panini press, and dishwasher
  • Cool down leftover food per safe food handling guidelines
  • Participate in closing cleaning responsibilities

Applying

Pre-employment background check and drug test are required.
 
The Rare Barrel is an Equal Opportunity Employer. Qualified applicants are considered for employment without regard to age, race, color, religion, sex, national origin, sexual orientation, disability or veteran status.
 
To apply, please send a resume and cover letter in a single PDF to charis@therarebarrel.com with the subject “Kitchen Application: LAST NAME, FIRST NAME”. Thank you!
 

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